Hip Arthroscopy: Month 3 Post-Op

It’s been a couple weeks since my last post, so here’s how things have been going:

  • I recently ran a half mile on the treadmill at a 10-minute mile pace.  I’m confident that my hip can handle running further, but two things have prevented me from doing so: 1) I seriously dislike running for distance, and 2) I’m in the middle of moving, so my gym time has gone down recently.
  • Since I like higher intensity exercise (i.e. playing sports instead of running a 5k), I pushed the treadmill to over 10 mph, and ran at that pace for 30-45 seconds.  I was too winded to go for longer, but my hip felt good afterwards.  It was certainly sore, but along the lines of what I would expect, having not run that fast in almost 3 months.
  • My PT gave me permission to start doing some jumping activities.  At this point, I think I can ease my way into sports, probably with some discomfort at the start (remember, my surgeon said from the beginning that it can take up to 6 months to feel normal again).  Being in the middle of moving, the availability of recreational sports is in flux.
  • My groin muscles continue to give me a little trouble, but I think it’s getting better.  If it is, it’s happening so slowly that it’s hard to tell, but I find myself wanting to massage/foam roll less frequently (not that I should).

I had my three month follow-up with my surgeon a week and a half ago, and had two main questions for him.

First, what is the discomfort in my groin and why does it feel like my hip needs to pop (which it did once, painfully)?  He said the discomfort is there because my acetabular rim is still healing, and couldn’t explain the popping, but wasn’t concerned.  Actually, typing out this post 10 days after that appointment, I realize I haven’t thought about the about-to-pop sensation in a week or so, so it seems to be subsiding.  (Fist pump)

My second question got a less satisfying answer.  I wanted to know how I could safely return to powerlifting, namely squats, deadlifts, and cleans.  His response was, “I don’t want to tell you what to do….but can you pick another hobby?”  I don’t think this is due to the FAI since I’ve seen people return to lifting after surgery, but due to the fact that my hips are slightly retroverted, meaning they point backwards instead of forwards.  My expertise here is limited (I have none), but I think because of the retroversion, I am literally limited in the range of motion I can achieve in my hips, which prevents me from safely performing these lifts when hip flexion beyond 90 degrees is required.

So that was a big disappointment, but I’ll have to find ways around it.  Here are a few exercises I can do that are similar to the lifts I should avoid:

  • Smith Machine squats, without getting to 90 degrees
  • One-leg squats, which allow me to better control the rotation of my hip, since I’ve only got to pay attention to one at a time (see picture below)
  • Hanging cleans, which I’ve done before

Basically, if it feels at all pinchy, I’ll stop immediately.  Here’s the pic of the one-leg squat:

One-leg-squat-3

My next post will probably come when I’ve started doing more lower body exercises, but as I mentioned, I’m moving and don’t have access to a gym at the moment.  I’ll keep everyone updated!

Are you recovering from surgery for FAI or a torn labrum, or considering it?  I’d love to hear how you’re rehab is going – feel free to post a comment or question below!

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2 thoughts on “Hip Arthroscopy: Month 3 Post-Op

  1. Thank you for this blog…. I am facing the same surgery with a “significant labral tear” and cartilage involvement at the end of the month. A little scared I must admit… but your blog made me feel better. I hoped you stopped blogging because you are better 🙂 Thanks again

    • Hi and thanks for reading! Actually, I am still posting on this blog, but only when there is news to share, which has been less frequent after three months. Good luck with your surgery!

      Brian

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